WANT PRIVACY? HERE’S HOW TO GET IT!

Guard Your Private Information.

 

From Read Write Web:

Gmail users got a hefty dose of reality today when it was revealed that Google handed over one user’s private data to the U.S. government, who requested it without a search warrant.

The contacts list and IP address data of Jacob Appelbaum, a WikilLeaks volunteer and developer for Tor was given to the U.S. government after they requested it using a secret court order enabled by a controversial 1986 law called the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, according to the Wall Street Journal. The law allows the government to demand information from ISPs not only without a warrant, but without ever notifying the user.

ReadWriteWeb then complains about privacy intrusions by government.

COULD THIS HAVE BEEN EXPECTED?

Wikileaks is all about attention grabbing — getting and embarrassing the government.

More tact and discretion would have saved the founder, Julian Assange and his whistle blowers from jail, fines, and embarrassment. If you run an organization that leaks illegally obtained private and Government data, you should expect the full force of the government (and maybe a lynch mob) to come after you and your associates.

It is a criminal offense to steal secret government documents. If a patriot chooses to put himself on the firing line by revealing government lies, Okay.But many of the recent Wikileaks were indiscriminate. One of their media partners actually revealed their password, Wikileaks had not changed it. A flood of private documents were released that could do no one any good. What they could do, and did do, is a lot of harm.

Besides stolen confidential diplomatic cables, there were other documents released. Wikileaks leaks were published, including stolen information on private Swiss anonymous bank account clients. They expected their financial info to stay private.

It is a criminal offense in Switzerland to steal secret or anonymous bank account documents or to leak private account information about revocable trusts, offshore companies, foundations and the like.

However, Bill Freeman says, PTs know how to keep their private information private — even from their own bankers. There is a not too fine line between public good, personal freedom and information security.

In this world of indiscriminate disclosure of everything (i.e. Facebook, twitter and blogs) Many stupid people publish private information about themselves that we don’t necessarily want to hear -and which could damage their future prospects.

Is it these same people who also harp on about privacy issues?

Why are many babbling netizens now upset because private data of a Wikileaks volunteer was handed over? Isn’t freedom of information the whole premise behind Wikileaks?Or is it that unlimited freedom of information about everything only counts when it isn’t something that Wikileaks or its informants are trying to keep secret.

If you want privacy, then don’t publish or tell anyone your secrets.

It’s that simple.

 

Bill Freeman

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